Cell phones measure received signal strength in dBm (decibels referenced to 1mW, a logarithmic scale where 1mW is equal to 0dBm). The bars on your phone are a visual representation of this measurement. You can see the numeric value for yourself in Field Test Mode.1 To activate Field Test Mode on an iPhone dial *3001#12345#* iPhone’s have two slightly different versions of Field Test Mode depending on which model of iPhone you have. iPhones powered by an Intel modem which includes models sold by AT&T and T-Mobile (A1784 (iPhone 7), A1778 (iPhone 7 Plus), A1905 (iPhone 8), A1897 (iPhone 8...

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New Name, Same Advanced Antenna Technology Allows You to Enhance Your Phone and Your Life   Brink Case Has Two Antenna Technology products: reach case for Enhanced Signal Strength and alara case (formerly Pong Case) for Cellphone Radiation Reduction   SALT LAKE CITY—November 17, 2017—Today Brink Case, a brand specializing in advanced antenna technology for wireless devices, made its official marketplace debut. Brink Case currently offers two product lines: alara case and reach case. alara is the evolution of the Pong case portfolio and focuses on reducing cellphone radiation exposure to a level that is as low as reasonably achievable,...

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Written by: Ryan McCaughey, PhD. In October 2017, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals refused to reconsider its decision to uphold a Berkeley ordinance that requires retailers to warn customers about cell phone radiation exposure. The CTIA [a group representing the U.S. wireless communications industry] and Association of National Advertisers (ANA) have until January 9, 2018, to petition the Supreme Court for a hearing. Berkeley’s ordinance which has been in effect since March 2016 requires cellphone retailers in the city to provide consumers with the following notification: “To assure safety, the Federal Government requires that cell phones meet radiofrequency (RF)...

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Researchers from the University of Sydney and the University of New South Wales, Australia published a study “Has the incidence of brain cancer risen in Australia since the introduction of mobile phones 29 years ago?” in Cancer Epidemiology in June 2016. The study investigated the association between brain cancer and the usage of a mobile phone in 19,858 men and 14,222 women diagnosed with brain cancer in Australia between 1982-2012. They found that age-adjusted brain cancer incidence rates (in those aged 20-84 years, per 100,000 people) had risen only slightly in males but were stable over 30 years in females....

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Over forty years ago an inspector at the Hartford, CT Police Department raised concern about the safety of the Motorola walkie-talkies they were using.  This concern about possible radiation absorption eventually led back to a Motorola lab in Florida where a newly hired engineer was asked to come up with a way to prove the devices were safe.  The concepts of the test they put together would eventually evolve and influence the current tests the FCC requires of cell phone manufacturers for radiation emissions. Ryan Knutson at the Wall Street Journal takes an in-depth look at cell phone radiation exposure and the...

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The Scientific American weighs in on the cell phone radiation cancer debate with an article by Christopher J. Portier and Wendy L. Leonard:  Do Cell Phones Cause Cancer? Probably, but It's Complicated.   They review the landscape of cell phone cancer radiation studies including a look at the recent National Toxicology Program (NTP) cancer study that showed cancer in rats exposed to cell phone radiation. They propose a careful review of the data as well as the real life human implications in order to understand it all.  They also provide a brief review of some of the human studies done both before and...

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